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Should good behaviour lessons be part of the curriculum?

by Happy Mom (follow)
Life (381)      Parenting (215)      Children (252)      Etiquette (55)     


Reaction to a shocking behavior
Reaction to shocking behavior


Our children are graduating out of high schools with less etiquettes and manners. Lack of respect of adults, lack of respect for the environment, general bad behaviour in public, being raucous and unruly, indecent use of language in public and at home, dressing inappropriately/indecently for events are just part of observed behaviour in young adults.

Parents must take a large part of blame in their children's behaviour and attitude because growing up to become decent human beings is part of the upbringing they should have imparted to their children.

There are anti-bullying courses, drugs and safety courses that are taught in schools as part of the curriculum. Do you think it might be a good idea to incorporate courses or sessions in schools that teach etiquette, manners and good behaviour.

#Etiquette
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#Children
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Everything you said there, is at the top of my list...!

I agree that 'Etiquette' should be a huge part of Any School Curriculum Big Time.
I am totally over bad manners from young people, swearing,rude...the list go's on and on.
It also starts in the home, but if enforced in school...you have a nice foundation.
I'm going to stop right here, it's such a huge issue with me...and I will go off
having a big melt down, don't get me started.
Oh, I wish I could vote TWICE for your answer!
by Rice
your very kind :)
by jonaja
Like many other things, etiquette is an acquired habit and should be part of the school curriculum.
We had compulsory etiquette classes in my private girls school. At the time, I took it for granted what was taught, but now I'm grateful. It's a great idea, but how to make it compulsory without eating into an already crowded curriculum?
How about including a weekly session in 'homeroom'. Although, this is no substitute for proper parenting, it is good for some kids because they may not have a good role model outside of school and sometimes it's a case of 'if only someone had taught me that back then'. Also, children's personalities etc are shaped in the first 7 years, so if manners are taught then, then hopefully kids would grow up with a better disposition.
Unfortunately, the parents of today don't seem to have the skill set of the previous generations. I don't think the Internet and social media help either. I felt way back when I was able to have children (25 odd years ago) that I didn't like the way the world was going so I chose not to have children. I think it's very hard for children growing up these days and unfortunately, there's a real lack of respect and morals and I think their parents are largely to blame. Not sure schools will fix it though. The teachers have enough on their plate. I think it would be like a step-mother or step-father trying to discipline their step-child. I don't think they'd listen.... Good luck to those trying to instil which should be natural occurring behaviour and set of life skills.

I know you're using it as a metaphor but step parents absolutely can, and do, discipline their step children, often successfully.

Manners aren't naturally occurring behaviours. They do have to be taught. And yes, it is parents' job to teach them, and I think at least some of us do a decent job of that. Sometimes people's expectations of kids' manners are a bit unrealistic. It takes time to learn this stuff. That's a big part of childhood.
I believe there are etiquette classes in some private schools. Not that I think you can do the same everywhere. I mean, children's behaviours are affected a lot by their living environment. It's no use teaching something like that in schools only for them to ignore it outside class.
I don't agree with you annep. You are suggesting that what children learn in school, they don't apply it in the outside world. Based on this assumption, then we shouldn't really be teaching children anything at all because they won't really use it in their real life. If children are misbehaving in public, then it is because they haven't learnt it. There are two places to learn: home and school. Other places are where you apply or implement what you learn. If the home is not doing its job, then school should have a look and assess if it can do the job.
I still strongly feel that it is indeed the job of parents to teach their children decency, respect, etiquette, etc.
“Our youth now love luxury. They have bad manners, contempt for authority; they show disrespect for their elders and love chatter in place of exercise; they no longer rise when elders enter the room; they contradict their parents, chatter before company; gobble up their food and tyrannize their teachers.” - Socrates.

Every generation thinks the young people have no respect for their elders and behave worse than they themselves did, and yet here we still are after thousands of years. The youth of today are probably no worse than when I was young, when my parents were young or when Socrates was young. It just starts to seem that way as you get older and forget what it was like to be young. It's really not a new problem, or a big one.

Teaching etiquette in schools couldn't hurt, but there's probably not much room in the curriculum for etiquette classes with all the other stuff they have to squeeze now. Maybe it if it was an elective it could work. However, the responsibility still falls on parents, as it always has. Speaking for myself I am trying to model good behaviour for my kids.
Baby Boomer's like me all say ''you were not even allowed to answer back, and if you did you would get one Look''. You would never ever say the 4 letter word in public or home.You were tought in school very good manners, and at home..Anyone caught to the opposite, one would talk in 'hush' tones about how badly they may have acted.It was seen as quite a big deal.
by jonaja
Hi Jennifer,
You have suggested perhaps that etiquette should be available as elective. I have suggested that perhaps it can be a visiting incursion: A session outside class by professional and expert coaches, perhaps address two or three grades together in a large auditorium, twice a year? Children will retain some of that information and if such a lecture could be organized in primary schools and re-enforced in high schools, it may have a rippling effect.
Agree, teaching nice manners should be essential. I know many parents leave it to the school system, yet parents must always be a positive role model for their kids. It is essential as I do focus on the nice people, yet sadly in society there are many rude people around. Definitely as early as possible. There are even private courses kids can do on learning to set the table, and chew with your mouth closed while eating etc.
What a great idea! Schools these days seem to be teaching more practical life skills than when I went through school.
Nope - they don't do enough work as it is - it's constantly dance, art, sport and so on. Parents should actually parent for a bit and stop expecting school and teachers to be responsible for everything...
We had compulsory etiquette classes in my private girls school. At the time, I took it for granted what was taught, but now I'm grateful. It's a great idea, but how to make it compulsory without eating into an already crowded curriculum?
How about including a weekly session in 'homeroom'. Although, this is no substitute for proper parenting, it is good for some kids because they may not have a good role model outside of school and sometimes it's a case of 'if only someone had taught me that back then'. Also, children's personalities etc are shaped in the first 7 years, so if manners are taught then, then hopefully kids would grow up with a better disposition.
Thank goodness my son turned out ok, I must have done something right. Gold star goes to daycare too who disciplined all the kids they look after as well and insist on please and thank you. Schools should have a life class, showing kids how to behave and what is expected of them after they have finished school and integrate with others, how to behave at an interview etc. I have heard some parents swearing loudly in front of their kids in the shopping centres, I have heard about the way their kids are brought up having to fend for themselves and most time not having much to eat. If the parents are like that there's not much hope for the kids and unfortunately the responsibility falls to the schools again.
well said :)
by jonaja
Certainly. I think some people behave badly because they really don't know any better. They may have never been taught or those lessons were not re-enforced properly.
Absolutely! I believe making a child into a decent human being by teaching them good manners and good behaviour is real success. Money does not make a person successful, rather it is their character. When I was at school going back more than 40 years ago we had a subject called "moral science" where we learnt basic ethics of life through stories etc. Now with the terrible decline of morality it is so much called for!
I don't think it should be taught in school, apart from preschool. Manners and respect should be taught at home. My mother taught us that we should always offer our seat to an adult, not just an elderly person and say please and thankyou. I always thank anyone who stands and offers me their seat. Funnily enough, it's been other females who have done so of late while the males make no attempt to stand. I also make a point of thanking and telling a child that they have lovely manners when they offer a seat or a helping hand.
Yeah, helga, the males don't stand up 'coz they don't want to decrease the width of their grotesque 'man spread'.................
by donjo
Lol Donjo. But some are so thin. Just think they don't care.
by helga
My parents' taught me good manners.
My Private Girls' School, had an educator, every month, in Grades IX-X, come & lecture us, in all areas' of etiquette, & good manners.

All that I learnt, I continue using to this day, & many people get a shock, when I show such! They're not used to seeing/ hearing the proper way of civilised behaviour nowadays.

I will not 'start' on ways of manners bad, as there's not enough room here!

Another reason, IMHO, for degradation in many good manners, respect, & dress, is the abandonment of National Service. Oh, & there was LESS crime then.
That was a good(?) idea labor, & Whitlam, & this Country's paid for that p@&$ poor decision ever since.

Two years, both males, & females, at 18 years of age. They'd be much better persons, for themselves, family, AND community afterwards!
Oh! Happy Mom......
Your photo is not of a shock reaction!
It's two Cappuchin Catholic priests in the middle of Mass. One just happens to be getting ready with responses in the Liturgy!

Bahahahahahahaha! LMAO! (thank you)
by Rice
Just read jonaj's answer . . . I agree with every word . . . including the meltdown. LOL
by Rice
Not only do I think it might be a good idea to incorporate courses or sessions in schools that teach etiquette, manners and good behaviour, it should be compulsury, and also be available for the not so responsible parents, as if the kids need it, then some parents do also.

On the other hand, I know how well behaved my kids are at home, but I can not guarantee what they get up to out with friends.
This point then becomes the difficult one, who is then responsible? I would stand up and say myself and say I am, but how would a course manners fix this situation? Is this not now purely a rebellion or a discipline issue? Anywho, what ever happened to 'seen and not heard'?
I do not know the answer to either as I do not believe there is a 'perfect solution' to all our worries.
Probably not -this is learnt at home.
by Finy
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