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Do you grown any native plants in your garden?

by Jennifer Muirhead (follow)
I am learning all the time. The tombstone will be my diploma ~ Eartha Kitt.
Environment (68)      Gardening (51)      Flowers (25)     


lilli pilli blossoms, native Australian trees
Lilly Pilly flowers being pollinated by a bee and an ant. Photo by Bahudhara, from Wikimedia Commons.


If you have a garden, do you grow any plants that are native to your area, or are they all imported species? If you have native plants, do you find that they encourage native birds or insects to your garden?

#Gardening
#Flowers
#Environment
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I have 2 Bottlebrush trees. They are very hardy and don't require much water. I plan on getting some more native plants for my front garden.
We have a tiny Illawarra Flame Tree seedling, which should be magnificent once it's fully grown. I don't think anything else we have at the moment is native though. I'd kind of like to grow some bush tucker plants if I can, and maybe a lilly pilly, more for the flowers than for eating the berries.
I don't.
Never have, I do not know the reason 'why' I don't, but it is more than likely bad gardening on my part.
I may have a real nice garden....but you have me thinking now?
''why don't I have one or two native plants''.
Unfortunately I don't because our garden is way to small. However, it is on our list of things to do when we purchase a house of our own! ;)
I used to be a native garden nut. I think I have mellowed with age as I find other species far easier to grow and make a better show of flowers and foliage.

Yes a lot of my garden is native, including a bottle brush tree, macadamia but tree and gum. We do have a lot of birds including rainbow lorikeets which is a hoot.

Yep. Love 'em! 99% or our garden is either a) native or b) food-producing. At an educated guess, (I say that means we have about 30 native Australian plants, including macadamia nuts).
by kimp
A bonus in this case is that the birds and other critters (eg frogs) that are attracted to our garden by the natives and little swampy-ponds around the place eat the pests that others eat our food-produce. We live near significant wetlands, yet we hardly ever get mosquitoes, and strangely enough we've never had snakes either...(but just about every other non-poisonous reptile)
by kimp
When we moved from our large property in the country to a small unit just outside Toowoomba, we had no garden at all. I had to have at least one tree and so I planted a grevellea.
90% of trees in our garden are native. They attract the wildlife, from frilly-lizards to lorikeets!
We have bottlebrush and grevellia and kangaroo paw but the bottlebrush is such a nuisance both with the leaves blowing all over the concrete and patgs and collecting in the drains. Even worse when the cockatoos and galahs visit and break the flowers off. Looks like a high wind has gone through the garden🍁
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